How to Implement P2 PBL

P2 Project Based Learning: Supporting the P2 Mission

The P2’s Weekly Slide Presentations, which classroom teachers use for daily character strength instruction, focus on three sequential components: UNDERSTAND, ENGAGE, REFLECT





Understand



Engage



Reflect

However, the P2 PBL process focuses on five sequential components: ENGAGE, INQUIRE, CREATE, REFLECT, SHARE



Engage



Inquire



Create



Reflect



Share

This process will be universal for all of the P2 PBL units, from grades K-12. The PBL process is a system for thoughtful problem-solving. As students become familiar with the steps, they will be able to transfer the system to other challenges they face in life. Students who engage in rigorous PBL will develop the skills they need to truly become life-long problem solvers.

*Note: PBL units can be completed independently or in a group. Educators will decide based on the needs of students and teachers. However, through the reflection stage, collaboration will be practiced in every project, whether group or individual.

Implementing P2 PBLs

The classroom culture that emerges through PBL naturally fits into the P2’s mission of empowering students to build positive relationships. It will also advance students’ understanding and application of the 24 character strengths and the Other People Matter Mindset:

 

5 Components of P2 PBLs

ENGAGE

Students will be exposed to an engaging and authentic challenge of making the world a better place — through the lens of improving ourselves, others, and the community.  The challenge will offer personal connection, relevance, and choice.

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN THE CLASSROOM:
Teachers will use the P2 PBL Project Introduction slides for the unit they choose to implement.  

The introduction will consist of four parts:

  • Pictures, videos, and/or open-ended questions that will build background knowledge and ground students in the context of the challenge. The student-facing questions will allow students to make connections to what they already know and explore their initial big ideas.
  • Next, teachers will expose students to the open-ended project challenge.
  • The teacher will facilitate the creation of a student-generated list of what they might need to know to successfully address the challenge. This list will create targets of what students will focus on during the inquiry phase.
  • The teacher will establish project parameters, timelines, requirements, options, etc.

*Note: These steps will be clearly outlined in the introductory slides, making implementation easy, regardless of familiarity with PBL.

INQUIRE

Students will explore the topic by gathering information and researching in a variety of ways. Graphic organizers will be used to support student research and help teachers formatively support students.

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN THE CLASSROOM:
Teachers will use the know/need to know list to support students in finding information in a variety of ways. The list will drive what students learn. While the goal is for students to be self-directed in their learning, teachers will create a variety of learning opportunities based on student readiness.

Options can include, but not be limited to:

  • Teacher-directed lessons
  • Station-based opportunities
  • Student-led research using a variety of texts, including technology
  • Interviewing experts

The project guidelines for each unit will offer a menu of options for the teacher to consider.

CREATE

Students will make or propose a unique solution that synthesizes what they learned.

The product may be a variety of options set up by the teacher or class.  Some options include:

  • Presentations
  • Debates
  • Websites
  • TED talks
  • Social media campaigns
  • PSAs
  • Plays
  • Visuals
  • Exhibits

(anything done in the real-world!)

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN THE CLASSROOM:
Students will synthesize content into their final product using any resources necessary. Teachers may limit or expand options for final products based on access to resources, time, ability to support, student interests, etc. Teachers could collaborate with resource teachers to gain support or maximize abilities to support students. The project guidelines for each unit will offer a menu of options for the teacher to consider.

REFLECT

Students will go through structured opportunities to reflect on their work, both formatively and summatively.  Students will be encouraged to use feedback to improve the quality of their product.

Students will learn to give and receive valuable feedback from many stakeholders, including:

  • Student self-reflection
  • Peer feedback
  • Teacher check-in and feedback

Follow this link to see a variety of options

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN THE CLASSROOM:
Teachers should establish opportunities for feedback.  The feedback should be used to improve the quality of work, leading back to the inquiry and create steps.

Opportunities could include:

  • Student self-reflection and process logs
  • Teacher-led discussions
  • Gallery walks
  • Teacher-student check-ins
  • Peer feedback protocols

The project guidelines for each unit will offer a menu of options for the teacher to consider.

SHARE

Students will share their products with an audience, who will be active listeners who provide feedback.

Audience will range from:

  • Peers
  • Other classes
  • School leaders
  • Parents
  • Professionals
  • Community members

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN THE CLASSROOM:
Teachers will establish routines or presentations with the audience.  Students will practice communication and presentation skills and should refer to the presentation checklist to build skills for success.  

The teacher could increase authenticity of the presentation by including higher stakes, outside-of-school stakeholders. The project parameters of each unit will include a variety of options for the teacher to consider.

Audience role: The audience can use graphic organizers to support them in providing feedback or guiding questions for the presenter.